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Advancing the NICU


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Advancing the NICU


 

MISSION

eLutions is developing a continuous, minimally-invasive, glucose monitor for neonatal bedside point-of-care.  Repeated heel pricks, of up to 25% of newborns 24-48 hours after birth, are the standard of care.  This is traumatic for babies and parents.  Caregivers’ aversions to heel pricks is cited for neglect, and missed interventions have led to lifelong muscular motor malfunction and cerebral palsy.

Continuous monitoring is vital as physiologies of fragile newborns are learning to adapt outside the womb.  Continuous care through timely monitoring and delivery of therapy is critical as neonatologists are challenged to keep delicate infants alive and healthy.

 
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Background


Background


 

eLutions is a medical devices company developing in vitro and ex vivo optical spectroscopy for point-of-care and mobile diagnostics.  It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).  eLutions is taking a bottom-up approach in developing custom "end-use" solutions.  It builds upon a strong mathematical foundation in data analysis and combines it with emerging and revolutionary optical technologies for miniaturization and portability.

eLutions has received $1.3M from NSF & NIH.  Its technology is 6 months from a testable prototype, and targeted for continuous and remote glucose monitoring in neonatal intensive care units (NICU's).  While there are multiple such markets in the ICU, and it remains the focus for the next two years, the grandest implications are for diabetes with a worldwide market of $50B+.

 
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Painless Monitoring


Continuous care for 24 to 48 hours after birth.

Painless Monitoring


Continuous care for 24 to 48 hours after birth.

Technology

Noninvasive continuous glucose monitoring is possible using a technique called Raman spectroscopy.  Laser light in the near-infrared (NIR) is delivered to the baby's skin using a fiber optic probe.

The collected light from the dermis layer of the skin contains information on the different molecules present and their concentrations.  The spectral information carried in the light response has signatures specific to glucose allowing a measurement of its concentration.

 

Raman spectroscopy for continuous measurement does not require repeatedly lancing the skin, nor an implanted sensor.  It does require initial calibration using traditional methods.  NIR mitigates issues with skin pigmentation and water absorption, and can achieve a signal-to-noise with clinically-worthy data.

Glucose levels are continuously displayed with trends.  This allows caregivers to better predict and prevent episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, and to properly ascribe their symptoms and prevent long-term debilitating outcomes.

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Collaborators


Collaborators


NSF

UCSF CHildren Hospital

NIH